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Faceted Stones A-E

Stone Name Color Treatment Usually Cut As
Synthetic Alexandrite Alexandrite (synthetic) Ranging from blue to red Laboratory-grown
8.25
Faceted
Simulated Alexandrite Alexandrite (simulated) Strong color changes range from bluish-green to bluish-purple to purplish-red. Some stones show more blue; some show more red

Imitation
Lab-Grown corundum created by the flame fusion method

9
Faceted
Alexandrite:
Natural Alexandrite is a type of chrysoberyl that shows a range of transparent colors, from blue in daylight to reddish-yellow in artificial light. Laboratory-grown Alexandrite shows a beautiful color range from red to blue and is more widely available than natural Alexandrite.
Alexandrite is a June birthstone in the modern tradition and an August birthstone in the ancient tradition.
Lore:
The stone was named for Czar Alexander II who, according to legend, came of legal age on the day the stone was first discovered.
Care: Avoid harsh detergents. Ultrasonic and steam cleaning are usually safe for lab-grown and simulated alexandrite.
Stone Name Color Treatment Usually Cut As
Amethyst, AA-Grade Amethyst, AA-Grade Deep purple with smaller stones sometimes appearing lighter Heat-treated
7
Cabochon
Faceted
Amethyst, A-Grade Amethyst, A-Grade Light to medium purple, some color zoning Heat-treated
7
Cabochon
Faceted
Simulated Amethyst Amethyst
(simulated)
Medium purple Assembled Laboratory-grown spinel doublet
8
Faceted

Amethyst:
Amethyst is the best known and most valuable form of quartz who's top grade is a deep purple and has no flaws or inclusions.
Its name is derived from the Greek amethustos; a- “not” and methyskein- “make drunk” from methys “wine”. This demonstrates the ancient belief that the amethyst would keep a person from becoming intoxicated.
The color can fade from an amethyst if the stone is left in strong sunlight for a long time.
Amethyst is a February birthstone in the modern and ancient tradition. It is associated with the astrological sign Pisces.

Lore:
Placed under the pillow, amethysts insure pleasant dreams, improve memory, and provide immunity from poison.
Some people believe that a wearer of this stone will become gentle and amiable.

Care: Avoid harsh detergents. Ultrasonic cleaning is usually safe for natural amethyst. Never steam clean. Simulated amethyst should never be cleaned ultrasonically or steam cleaned.

Stone Name Color Treatment Usually Cut As
Ametrine Ametrine Honey yellow and purple None
7
Faceted
Ametrine:
A naturally occurring bi-colored stone it is composed of two of the most valuable forms of quartz, Amethyst and Citrine. Ametrine was discovered in 1977 and can only be found in Bolivia.
Care: Avoid harsh detergents. Ultrasonic cleaning is usually safe. Never steam clean.
Stone Name Color Treatment Usually Cut As
Aquamarine Aquamarine Fine blue Heat-treated
7.5-8
Cabochon
Faceted
Simulated Aquamarine Aquamarine
(simulated)
Blue Imitation
Laboratory-grown spinel
8
Faceted
Aquamarine:
Aquamarine is a transparent gem of the beryl family who's name derives from the Latin aqua marina “sea water”.
This gem increased in popularity around 1920 when heat treatment was developed to turn pale stones into deeper blue shades.
Aquamarine is a March birthstone in the modern tradition, an October birthstone in the ancient tradition, and associated with the astrological sign Scorpio.
Lore:
It is traditionally a sailor's talisman.
Care: Ultrasonic and steam cleaning are usually safe for natural aquamarine. Simulated aquamarine should not be cleaned ultrasonically or by steam.
Stone Name Color Treatment Usually Cut As
Citrine Citrine Ranges from light to medium gold with some color zoning. Smaller stones have a lighter color; larger stones have a deeper color. Heat-treated
7
Cabochon
Faceted
Citrine:
Although citrine is often mistakenly referred to as topaz, it belongs to the quartz family. The yellow color of citrine is due to the presence of iron.
They can be found naturally or may be made by heating amethyst (purple quartz) to around 550° C (1050° F). Citrines made from heating amethyst have a deeper color and are more expensive than the natural stone.
Yellow-brown variety is called carngorn after their place of origin in Scotland.
Dark reddish-brown quartz is called “sang de boeuf,” French for ox blood.
The gemstone has been used since the Hellenistic Age in Greece (323-280 B.C.). During the first and second centuries A.D. in Greece and Rome, citrine was used for intaglios and ring cabochons.
Citrine is a November birthstone.
Care: Avoid harsh detergents. Ultrasonic cleaning is usually safe. Never steam clean.
Stone Name Color Treatment Usually Cut As
Chrome Diopside Chrome Diopside Intense, deep green None
5.5-6
Faceted

Chrome Diopside:
A member of the pyroxene family and contains chromium, an element that provides its rich green color.

Caution: Avoid harsh detergents. Never clean ultrasonically. Never steam clean.

Stone Name Color Treatment Usually Cut As
White CZ CZ  White Laboratory-grown
8.5
Faceted
Green  CZ Green CZ Medium green Laboratory-grown
8.5
Faceted
Green  CZ Lavender CZ Light purple Laboratory-grown
8.5
Faceted
Pink CZ Pink CZ Medium pink Laboratory-grown
8.5
Faceted
Purple CZ Purple CZ Medium purple Laboratory-grown
8.5
Faceted
Yellow CZ Yellow CZ Medium yellow Laboratory-grown
8.5
Faceted
CZ:
A transparent manmade gem from the element zirconium. It is the most widely used Diamond substitute (imitation diamonds).
Care: Avoid harsh detergents. Safe for both ultrasonic and steam cleaning
Stone Name Color Treatment Usually Cut As
Emerald AAA Grade Emerald, AAA grade Medium green Oiled
7.5-8
Faceted
Emerald, AA grade Emerald, AA grade Medium to light green Oiled
7.5-8
Faceted
Emerald, A grade Emerald, A grade Light to medium green Oiled
7.5-8
Cabochon
Faceted
Synthetic Emerald Emerald
(synthetic)
Medium to light green Synthetic
8.25
Cabochon
Faceted
Simulated Emerald Emerald
(simulated)
Medium to light green Assembled
8
Faceted
Emerald:
A green variety of beryl with traces of chromium and vanadium in its crystalline structure giving emerald it's green color. Emeralds are considered very valuable if they are strong in color and free of inclusions. Inclusions are referred to as the “jardin” (French, garden) of the stone.
It has been prized since 4000 B.C. and was traded in early gem markets of Babylon.
Until the 16th century the Egyptian emerald mines (worked as early as 2000 B.C.) were the main source of emeralds for the West. By this time finer-quality emeralds were being mined in Colombia, these eventually became the world's most coveted emeralds.
Emeralds are a May birthstone in the modern tradition, a May and June birthstone in the ancient tradition, and are associated with the astrological sign Cancer.
Lore:
Emeralds were linked to fertility and the Earth Goddess, it is a birthstone of spring.
Sacred to the Goddess Venus and worn by women to ease childbirth.
They have been said to stifle and epileptic fit.
Care: Avoid harsh detergents. Do not clean emeralds in an ultrasonic machine. The solution may penetrate the stone and cause it to shatter. Never steam clean.
 

Sources for the above information:
Gem supply catalogue.
McCreight, Tim. The Complete Metalsmith: An Illustrated Handbook. Worcester, Massachusetts, U.S.A.: Davis Publications, INC, 1991.
Douglas Harper. “Online Etymology Dictionary.” November 2001. http://www.etymonline.com

Last updated 11/26/11