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Faceted Stones F-R

Stone Name Color Treatment Usually Cut As
Green Fluorite Green Fluorite Pale green None
5.5-6
Faceted
Mixed Fluorite Mixed Fluorite Pale green and lavender. some stones are more lavender than green None
5.5-6
Faceted
Fluorite:
This is one of the most colorful minerals in the world. In a single stone you may see numerous glowing colors; blue, green, yellow, purple, white and even reddish
Care: Because fluorite is a soft gemstone, it should not be used in rings. Avoid harsh detergents. Never clean ultrasonically. Never steam clean.
Stone Name Color Treatment Usually Cut As
Almandine Garnet Almandine Garnet Medium to brownish red None
7-7.5
Cabochon
Faceted
Almandine-Pyrope Garnet Almandine-Pyrope Garnet Dark red None
7-7.5
Cabochon
Faceted
Rhodolite Garnet Rhodolite Garnet Rose to lavender None
7-7.5
Cabochon
Faceted
Hessonite Garnet Hessonite Garnet Yellow-orange to reddish orange None
7-7.5
Faceted
Tsavorite Garnet Tsavorite Garnet Intense green None
7-7.5
Faceted
Synthetic Green Garnet Green Garnet
(synthetic)
Medium green Laboratory-grown
8.25
Faceted
Simulated Garnet Garnet
(simulated)
Deep red Laboratory-grown corundum
7-7.5
Faceted
Garnet:
Rich in iron and chromium giving them their color, garnets exhibit few inclusions. Inclusions that are present tend to be rounded, seed like crystals with irregular edges.
Garnet is one of the world's most ancient gems and was called carbuncle by early civilizations. The term carbuncle once referred to any red gem but now it refers only to red cabochon-cut garnet.
The name garnet comes from the Medieval Latin word granatum (pomegranate) referring to the stones color or its seed like crystal formation.
Rhodolite Garnet is found in metamorphic rock and gets its purplish color from iron-contaning trace impurities. It gets its name from the Greek rhodo (rose) and litho (stone).
Hessonite Garnet is also known as “cinnamon stone.” It is a grossularite mineral with its reddish-orange color coming from its iron content.
Tsavorite Garnet owes it vibrant green color to its vanadium and chromium content.
Garnet is a January birthstone and is associated with the astrological sign Aquarius.
Lore:
Garnets have long been associated with blood because of their red color. Native soldiers in the Kashmir fought the British with bullets made of garnet believing that they would magically find their way to their targets as recently as 1892.
When on the body, garnets are said to prevent skin diseases.
Garnet is said to assure the wearer of love, faithfulness and safety from wounds.
When danger approaches, the stone looses it brilliance.
Garnets are said to protect the wearer from evil and from terrifying dreams.
Care: Ultrasonic cleaning is usually safe for natural and synthetic garnet. Never steam clean natural or synthetic garnet. Simulated garnet is usually safe in ultrasonic and steam cleaning.
Stone Name Color Treatment Usually Cut As
Iolite Iolite Violet-blue None
7-7.5
Cabochon
Faceted
Iolite:
Derived from the Greek ios (violet) and lithos (stone), iolite is the gem name for cordierite, a silicate of aluminum and magnesium.
Sometimes called dichroite, alluding to its dichroic properties, it shows two or more colors according to the direction in which it is viewed through transmitted light.
Most iolite is found in gravel beds in the form of water-worn pebbles and is sometimes called “water sapphire” because of its color.
Care: Avoid harsh detergents. Never clean ultrasonically or steam clean.
Stone Name Color Treatment Usually Cut As
Mexican Fire Opal Mexican Fire Opal Reddish orange; color varies slightly None
5-6.5
Faceted
Mexican Fire Opal:
These opals tend to have one body color and do not usually contain the flashes of light and color typical of other opals. Mexican fire opal is the only natural opal that is normally faceted.
Care: Avoid harsh detergents. Never clean ultrasonically or steam clean.
Stone Name Color Treatment Usually Cut As
Peridot Peridot Medium green None
6.5-7
Cabochon
Faceted
Simulated Peridot Peridot
(simulated)
Light green to olive green Assembled
Lab-grown spinel doublet
8
Faceted
Peridot:
Sometimes called chrysolite, peridot is a gem from the mineral olivine. Its yellowish to vibrant green color is caused by iron.
Before the advent of modern chemistry, stones were classified by color only: all red stones were rubies and all green stones were emeralds. The “emeralds” which we now know to be peridot were mined on St. John's Island (also called Zebirget) in the Red Sea as long ago as 1300 B.C. At that time the island was known as Topazios and the green gems were called topaz.
Peridot is an August birthstone.
Lore:
In ancient Hebrew writings this stone is linked with the Tribe of Simeon.
Peridot was believed to cure liver disease and dropsy, to free the mind from envious thoughts, and to dispel terrors of the night. For full magical power it is said that peridot should be set in gold.
Care: Avoid harsh detergents. Never clean ultrasonically or steam clean either peridot shown here.
Stone Name Color Treatment Usually Cut As
Lemon Quartz Lemon Quartz Soft yellow Irradiated and heat-treated
7
Faceted
Smoky Quartz Smoky Quartz Medium smoky brown Irradiated
7
Faceted
Quartz:
Quartz is the most common of all minerals. Included in the quartz family are amethyst, citrine, flint, onyx, aventurine, jasper, carnelian, rock crystal, agate and chrysoprase.
Smoky Quartz is often incorrectly called smoky topaz.
From the German Quarz meaning “rock crystal.”
Care: Avoid harsh detergents. Ultrasonic cleaning is usually safe. Never steam clean.
Stone Name Color Treatment Usually Cut As
Ruby, AAA grade Ruby, AAA grade Medium red Heat-treated
9
Faceted
Ruby, AA grade Ruby, AA grade Dark red Heat-treated
9
Faceted
Ruby, A grade Ruby, A grade Medium to light red Heat-treated
9
Cabochon
Faceted
Synthetic Ruby Ruby
(synthetic)
Dark to medium rose-pink, usually with creme-white banding Laboratory-grown corundum
9
Cabochon
Faceted
Ruby:
A corundum that occurs as a deep red transparent stone and as an opaque reddish-gray material. Ruby owes its red color to traces of chromium; the depth of color is determined by the amount of chromium.
When flawless, a ruby is more valuable than a diamond.
Synthetic Ruby is laboratory grown corundum that has the same optical, physical and chemical properties as their natural counterpart and are produced for jewelry, watch bearings and laser equipment.
Historically, ruby is associated with royalty and the power of life and death.
Ruby is a July birthstone in the modern tradition, a July and December birthstone in the ancient tradition, and associated with the astrological signs Capricorn and Leo.
Lore:
It's been said that rubies ensure a peaceful, harmonious, healthy life as well as to control ones passions and thoughts.
To many ruby's color represents heat, life and power.
Rubies were attributed the power to prevent loss of blood and strengthen the heart.
Care: Avoid harsh detergents. Ultrasonic and steam cleaning are usually safe for natural and synthetic ruby.
 

Sources for the above information:
Gem supply catalogue.
McCreight, Tim. The Complete Metalsmith: An Illustrated Handbook. Worcester, Massachusetts, U.S.A.: Davis Publications, INC, 1991.
Douglas Harper. “Online Etymology Dictionary.” November 2001. http://www.etymonline.com

Last updated 11/26/11